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PCB Project
  • OVERVIEW
  • PROGRESS
  • Gef Focal Area And/Or Fund(S) Strategies, Eligibility Criteria And Priorities

    The project and its proposed activities are consistent with the GEF-5 Chemicals Results Frameworks’ goal “to promote the sound management of chemicals throughout their life-cycle in ways that lead to the minimizations of significant adverse effects on human health and the global environment.”

    In particular, the project will contribute to Objective 1 “Phase Out POPs and Reduce POPs Releases” through the following interventions:

    GEFV Strategy Indicator: Outcome 1.4: POPs waste prevented, managed and disposed of; Indicator 1.4.1 Amount of PCBs and PCB-related wastes disposed of, or decontaminated; measured in tons as recorded in the POPs tracking tool. The project will develop a Regional mechanism for ESM of decommissioned and phased out PCB liquids and equipment and will achieve the disposal of 2,500 tonnes (4,000 pieces) of PCB equipment from 12 countries, including the disposal of a limited amount (200t) of highly contaminated equipment through export to a licensed PCB disposal facility outside the region. The remaining PCB wastes making up the 2,500 tonne total will be treated according to concentration of PCB. Technologies to be applied will be confirmed but will potentially include the retrofilling and decontamination at the national level (utilizing a disposal contractor with a mobile dechlorination unit/or BCD techniques); and, regional level disposal of liquid wastes in a cement kiln subject to a feasibility study and trials.

    GEFV Strategy Indicator: Outcome 1.5: Country capacity built to effectively phase out and reduce releases of POPs; Indicator 1.5.2 Progress in developing and implementing a legislative and regulatory framework for environmentally sound management of POPs, and for the sound management of chemicals in general, as recorded through the POPs tracking tool.

    Participating countries are all eligible to receive GEF funding as per the criteria set by the COP, that is: being a Party to the Stockholm Convention; and having submitted the NIP to the SC Secretariat. In the case of Namibia, the NIP is expected to reach the SC Secretariat soon.

  • A.4. THE BASELINE AND ANY ASSOCIATED BASELINE PROJECTS

    Global environmental problems, root causes and barriers that need to be addressed

    Approximately 1.7 million tonnes of PCBs were produced between 1929 and 1989 and a lot of the equipment containing PCBs is still in use somewhere, or stocked awaiting final disposal. Once PCBs are released into the environment they do not break down, but travel over long distances and continue to pose health risks to humans.

    The Stockholm Convention requires that all equipment containing concentrations of PCB above 0.05% be phased out of equipment by 2025 and all PCB be subject to ESM for final disposal by 2028. This project is aims to contribute to attaining this Convention requirement, through organizing the countries in Southern Africa, and achieving the ESM of PCB and destruction of the POP content in the oil.

    Currently owners and holders of PCB equipment are hampered in their efforts to improve management standards because the relatively small market for such work in each country inhibits local investment by competent service providers. Access to international service provision is both logistically difficult and prohibitively expensive. Current local waste management of PCB equipment results in uncontrolled PCB releases from unprotected metal reclamation or, worse, the selling of PCB oils other (immediate) uses. Such uses pose significant health and environmental threats and are not permitted under both the Stockholm Convention and the Basel Convention. This project aims to address these barriers.

    Baseline scenario and any associated baseline projects

    Nearly eleven years after entry into force of the Stockholm Convention and despite that fact that all countries participating in this project have finalized their national implementation plan (NIP) or are close to finalization, the regional picture on the presence and status of PCB remains scattered. An assessment of national PCB inventory data gathered from the NIPs indicates that countries participating in this project hold between 1,000 to 2,500 transformers containing PCB oil with an estimated total weight of between 1,000 and 2,500 tonnes. Of these, an estimated 400 and 700 tonnes is pure PCB oil. In addition, the assessment estimates the presence of more than 10,000 transformers in which the dielectric fluid is contaminated by PCB at a level greater than 0.05% PCB; thus, above the low POP content that is laid down in the Basel Technical Guidelines on POPs as Waste. The estimated total weight of these transformers is 10,000 tonnes, including 2,000 tonnes of contaminated oils. The electrical utilities are estimated to hold approximately 80% of this equipment. The report also notes that:

    1. participating countries do not, for the most part, have specific regulations or administrative mechanisms governing PCB oils, equipment and wastes (and there is a lack of a purchasing policy with regards to second hand transformers);
    2. the electrical utilities and other owners of PCB equipment currently lack the means to apply ESM practices to PCB equipment in service, in storage or out of service;
    3. despite awareness-raising efforts during NIP preparation, owners of PCB oils, equipment and wastes are frequently unaware of the threats that PCB pose to human health and the environment;
    4. environmentally-sound infrastructure for storage and destruction is not available in participating countries;
    5. there are no systematic investment mechanisms to support the ESM of PCB wastes;
    6. the preliminary national inventories available as a result of NIP development are not sufficiently detailed for the purposes of phase-out and disposal planning and detailed inventories of equipment will be needed at enterprise level in the early stages of the full project.

    Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, Website: http://chm.pops.int/Implementation/PCBs/Overview/tabid/273/Default.aspx (Accessed: 29 January 2015)

    As a result, PCBs are being released into the environment both at unprotected maintenance and storage sites; and during waste management operations concentrating on metals recovery. Furthermore, PCB fluids from transformers are being mixed with mineral dielectric oils during maintenance and subsequently reused in previously uncontaminated transformers, thereby cross-contaminating, potentially, the whole transformer population.

    Preliminary data concerning PCB contaminated transformers, capacitors and other material from national inventories, which are far from to be countrywide and complete, indicates the current estimate of 5,460 pcs representing more then 5,200t. However, it is expected that the project will only be able to treat and dispose of 4,000 pcs of PCB contaminated equipment in the participating countries. The total volume to be disposed in frame of this project is expected to reach 2,500t.

    The data provided in the preliminary inventory cannot be used to establish a reliable disposal plan because: the total weight, and the weight of dielectric fluids lack clear delineation; there is no clear definition of PCB waste; and the quantities are not linked to transformers in use and out of use. An accurate disposal plan requires the aforementioned data.

    As such, the disposal plan proposed to be financed by the project is based on a key distribution mechanism of quantities according the percentage of each national inventory on the regional inventory. This plan is detailed in Section B3 (cost-effectiveness).

    This is a regional project, but it is acknowledged that participating countries are at varying levels of PCB management. As such, a two-tier approach will be applied, aiming to bring up all countries to the level of having complete PCB inventories. However if these inventories are not complete in time for disposal activities, the project will not be delayed. Instead, countries with incomplete inventories will be placed in the second tier, and inventory work continued. Those with complete inventories, will move on to the dispsoal phase. A follow up initiative will be planned for countries in the second tier.

    Proposed alternative scenario: Components and Outcomes

    The project will complete inventory and PCB disposal activities in SADC countries. Countries are at varied stages of PCB management, and to ensure the project is not delayed, the project will take a two-tiered approach. Disposal activities will focus on the more advanced countries, while building capacity in the others. A post-inventory feasibility study will confirm the disposal plan, but the project will involve: retrofilling and decontamination at the national level (utilizing a disposal contractor with a mobile dechlorination unit/or BCD techniques); regional level disposal of liquid wastes in a cement kiln; and export of a limited amount (200t) of highly contaminated liquid and solid waste for disposal. This stratification of options is summarised in the decision tree below and detailed in the Section B3 (Cost Effectiveness pages 26-29).

    pcb-image  PCB Project pcb image

  • Project component 1: Enhancement and Regional Harmonization

    Expected outcome:

    National regulation and international requirements identified in 12 participating countries including infrastructure and enforcement capacities resulting in a Regionally harmonized approach for the environmentally sound management of PCB oils, equipment and wastes

    Expected output:

    1.1 National regulations in 12 countries on the ESM of PCB and PCB wastes in the context of the Stockholm and Basel Conventions reviewed.

    Planned activities:

    • Draft regulation and Guidance documents developed and submitted for adoption at the regional level;

    The first project activity is to facilitate the regional cooperation to develop and agree upon the relevant Guidance documents for the ESM of PCB. The Guidance documents will be based on existing manuals developed by Basel Convention, but will be adapted to the specifics of the region, and include appropriate tools: for transboundary cooperation, involvement of the private sector (service providers), roles of control bodies, enforcement strategies, and PCB identification. Where necessary, relevant guidance documents will need to be translated into French and Portuguese to allow their effective application.

    • 12 countries submit for adoption draft national regulation, with minimum requirements of Stockholm and Basel and Rotterdam Conventions, supported by Guidance documents for different aspects of ESM of PCB.

    The project will assist countries with the relevant legislative instruments to be developed and adopted. Draft PCB Regulation will include the minimum requirements of the Stockholm and Basel and Rotterdam Conventions, and cover all phases of PCB lifecycle, and all stakeholders. Due to the period of time required to adopt and implement a PCB legal framework, being longer that the project lifetime, the project will focus on interim short-term measures, such as a decree, which can be established directly by the competent authority. Each participating country will then be responsible to transpose the draft PCB regulation into the country specific legislative instrument, which could be standalone, or be widen to be included in, or create a base for more complex chemicals management law and subsequent ordinances.

    Expected output:

    1.2 Improved administrative capacity for controlling PCB in 12 participating countries.

    Planned activities:

    • PCB ESM coordinator designated in government in all participating countries

    Participating countries designate the national PCB ESM coordinator, who will be a contact point for the national project tasks and will represent the country in the regional meetings and activities.

    • Inspectors and customs staff trained

    Specific training activities will be deployed for inspectors and customs staff to be able to implement the control measures in the participating countries. Such a regional training will cover at least application of the developed and agreed PCB Guidance documents, as well as specifics of identification of PCB contaminated material and waste, measures to identify of inappropriate retrofilling and recycling activities, as well as transboundary movement of second-hand PCB contaminated equipment. Training will be also include training on national database of PCB contaminated equipment as well as techniques for PCB identification, labelling and proper storage and basic analytical techniques to be used for the PCB content verification.

    Training activities will use “training-of-trainers” methodology and involve two inspectors and two customs officers from each of the participating countries. The training will be organized as a regional activity where cooperation of partners from the participating countries will have possibility to share their experiences and views for the best applicability of the PCB ESM especially enforcement measures.

    • Responsible persons in power, transport and distribution electricity supply utilities and other stakeholders designated

    Electricity supply utilities participating in the project will designate the coordinator who will be a contact point and represent the electricity supply utility in the coordination meetings and relevant national and regional project activities.

    • Pilot National database of PCB contaminated equipment established at regional level and replicated in 12 participating countries.

    Regionally harmonized, national databases should be used for recording of an inventory activities as well as control measures. PCB contaminated equipment database will be a clearly defined legislative duty for PCB owners, maintained by the appointed governmental authority. The database will include the identification details of the respective equipment, location, owner, PCB contents, classification (labelling), actual usage and storage conditions and phase out plan.

    The database will also contain all fabrication data concerning suspected and controlled equipment and PCB oil stored in drums, and PCB contaminated wastes.

    National databases will be regionally harmonized (in terms of format), and regionally accessible, providing a reliable source of information for PCB management and planning of disposal activities.

    Expected output:

    1.3 Regional action plan for ESM and PCB treatment developed and applied in 12 countries.

    Planned activities:

    • Regional action plan developed and adopted at the regional level;

    Regional action plan for ESM and PCB treatment is to be a platform for regional cooperation and will be built up on draft regulation and guidance documents developed. Regional action plan will discuss the procedures of multilateral cooperation in terms of transboundary movement of PCB contaminated material and wastes for treatment and final disposal, joint custom control activities, potential building of procedures for acceptance of certified service providers to perform transport, interim storage, dismantling and related activities and more. Rules for training, testing and licencing of private service providers will be agreed. Licensing will cover: collection, draining and transport of PCB contaminated equipment. Risk assessment and priority setting rules for the planning of phase-out and disposal activities will also be agreed.

    The process of Regional action plan for ESM and PCB treatment development, consultation and adoption through appropriate means and processes, will be coordinated by the Executing Agency in close cooperation with the national PCB ESM coordinators. A feasibility study will be commissioned to evaluate the feasibility and cost effectiveness of schemes. A regional workshop will also be organized with participation of the countries governments representatives, representatives of power supply companies, NGOs and private service providers.

    • Regional action plan applied in 12 participating countries;

    The Regional action plan for ESM and PCB treatment has to be adopted through appropriate means or processes.

  • Project Component 2: Enhanced regional capacity for ESM of PCB containing equipment in service.

    Expected outcome:

    12 countries monitoring PCB containing equipment in service and tracking system established to follow until final phase out of PCB in electrical equipment

    Expected output:

    2.1 Training for identification and quantification of PCB containing oils and equipment;

    Planned activities:

    • Templates for PCB inventories and tracking system developed, adopted and distributed

    Adopt templates developed in Component one for database for the management of in-use transformers.

    • Training for identification and quantification provided

    Identification and quantification of PCB containing equipment and associated owners is a key aspect of the inventory and control activities. Training will reflect the guidance documents developed in the project component 1. In the initial project activities it will be discussed and agreed preferable strategies for PCB analysis – in situ and laboratory methods.

    Training will be organized in each participating country, or in neighbouring countries, with the aim of training four attendees per participating country. The practical part of the training will be provided in small groups for up to 12 attendees. Attendees will represent governmental officials as well as electricity supply utilities and representatives of other private PCB owners.

    • Feasibility study for the PCB analysis method

    Will determine the most feasible and cost effective method for testing oils from in-service transformers.

    2.2 Detailed inventories of PCB containing oils and equipment held by utility companies in 12 participating countries developed (in use and in waste);

    Planned activities:

    • Inventory verification plans developed and adopted

    Inventory verification activities will be jointly done by authorities (through a national consultant) and private sector – electricity supply companies and other PCB owners. Country wide PCB inventory and updating report every five years is a duty which every Party to the Stockholm Convention needs to achieve. The project aims to create the capabilities of the region to provide the PCB inventories verification reflecting available data and countries phase out plans of the PCB contaminated equipment. Inventory verification plans will be in line with guidance documents and inventory form will be used to document the data for the PCB contaminated equipment database.

    Priority samples will be collected and analysed for the PCB content. All data from inventory verification phase will be documented and used for the regional phase-out planning.

    • Collection and analysis of oil samples

    Power utility companies will samples. Project has budgeted for an average of 500 samples per country, but the number of samples collected per country will be adjusted based on annual production of electricity (which is an indicator of amount of equipment).

    Analyses will be performed according to the results of feasibility study by certified laboratories, selected by open tender.

    • Information held by stakeholders included in the national database.

    All relevant information will be documented by each electricity company in the national database of PCB contaminated equipment and available for regional phase-out and disposal planning.

    2.3 Detailed inventories of PCB containing equipment held by other sectors in 12 countries developed;

    Planned activities:

    • Inventory verification plans developed and adopted;

    Inventory activities will be jointly done by authorities and private sector other then power supply utilities – PCB owners. Priority samples will be collected and analysed for the PCB content. All data from inventory preparatory phase to collection and analysis will be documented and used for the phase-out planning.

    • Collection and analysis of samples

    Based on country specific priority setting, following inventory verification plans, PCB owners will collect relevant number of samples. Project has budgeted for 150 samples per country, but this will be adjusted based on the number of PCB owners per country. Analyses will be performed by the certified laboratories.

    • Information held by stakeholders included in the national database.

    All relevant information will be documented by each electricity company in the national database of PCB contaminated equipment and available for regional phase-out and disposal planning.

    2.4 Disposal option feasibility study, and regional decision making meeting on PCBs in use and PCB waste (including preparation of draft phase-out plan documents);

    Planned activities:

    • BAT/BEP feasibility study (using decision tree)

    Using the inventory data as a basis for analysis, a BAT/BEP feasibility study will be completed to inform decision making on disposal plan.

    • Regional decision making meeting

                      Will evaluate the situation concerning identified PCB contaminated equipment and wastes and plan phase-out and disposal activities, and be informed by the BAT/BEP feasibility study. Each participating country will present the inventory and verification results based on analytical results and country priorities.

                      Tasks to be decided and agreed include: PCB contaminated equipment and wastes for the phase-out and disposal program of this project; Types of technology/ies to be used for phase-out and disposal with amounts to be treated in the region or overseas; Dismantling and metal re-use strategy; Transport, collection and interim storage of PCB contaminated equipment and wastes; Mode of service providers selection and approval (handling, storage, transport, analysis, compliance control activities); Logistics and coordination; and Control measures and monitoring in the field.

    PCB preliminary inventories indicate that vast majority of PCB contaminated transformers/oil are in the range of 50 – 500 ppm. If this is the case, then an alternative strategy could be agreed upon to deploy dechlorination technology(ies) (preferably mobile or semimobile) to perform decontamination locally on-line, leaning process with anionic surfactant should be tested and implemented for PCB contaminated solid parts.

    2.5 Phase out plan proposed and endorsed by utility companies and other PCB containing equipment owners;

    Planned activities:

    • The phase-out plan adopted at the national level by utility companies and other PCB containing equipment owners.

    Once the regional phase-out plan is adopted, it will be adopted at the national level by responsible governmental body, power utility companies and other PCB containing equipment owners. The PCB owners will be required to provide signed confirmation of PCB wastes availability for the disposal in time and quantities recorded in the database. Specific contracts will be negotiated with every PCB owner participating in the project disposal activities.

    • Financial mechanism for replacement cost of transformers
  • Project Component 3: Regional mechanism for ESM of decommissioned and phased out

    Expected outcome: PCB and PCB containing equipment disposed of in an environmentally sound manner in accordance with the Stockholm Convention from 12 countries, and verified through independent monitoring.

    Expected output:

    3.1 Training of utilities for collection, draining and transport of PCB contaminated transformers

    Planned activities:

    • Training of utility personnel, and procedures in place to perform collection, draining and transport of PCB;

    Due to regular maintenance activities, qualified personnel are available for manipulation of electric devices based on internal rules and procedures. This personnel will be additionally trained for the PCB handling. To adequately manage tasks linked to the PCB contaminated equipment identification, labelling, collection and transport, specific measures have to be implemented by the companies reflecting legal requirements and best practices. Facility for interim storage of PCB wastes should be available before the collection and disposal phase at least one per the project country. This interim storage place should not necessarily be in the ownership of the power supply utility. It is possible to select licence service provider(s) which could take responsibility for collection and transport of PCB wastes.

    Obligations of the PCB Wastes Owner: to cooperate in terms of technical support and PCB waste preparation including provision of manpower and technical staff; to provide a PCB disposal plan; and to provide all necessary information/certificates to enable arrangement of all necessary clearances for approval of statutory authorities (waste transportation permits, hazardous waste manifest; documentation required by Basel convention, etc.).

    • Companies licenced to collect, drain and transport of PCB hazardous waste available in the region

    The project will support the local capabilities for hazardous wastes management. Collaboration with local businesses will at first be through the promotion of local services for the environmentally sound collection and transport of PCB containing equipment and secondly, by promoting the recovery of decontaminated, scrap metal by local businesses. This activity is closely related to the regional approach and licensing procedures for the service providers so these could be accepted also in countries of the region.

    3.2 At least 3,000 transformers collected at national storages and 80% of them drained;

    Planned activities:

    • At least 3,000 transformers collected and drained under environmentally sound manner.

    The environmentally sound collection, transport and dismantling (drain) of PCB containing transformers should be preferably done locally (each project country should have at least one place secured for manipulation and interim storage of PCB wastes) by licensed service providers. If not possible, or the actual location of PCB wastes makes more feasible to target for the environmentally sound collection and dismantling the interim storage place and licensed service provider in the neighbouring country, then this will be done in coordination with the responsible authorities. Information obtained during the PPG phase indicates that several utilities have developed temporary storage for PCB contaminated transformers. These include CEC and ZESCO, and SEC, Swaziland. These facilities will be utilized for project activities with required compliance works related to PCB storage

    According to IMDG regulation, only non-leaking transformers can be transported without draining. It is expected that at least 80% of PCB contaminated transformers will be drained and PCB oil safely stored in the UN certified barrels for transport and final disposal, locally or overseas. For a efficiency a regional approach will be taken for: procurement of packaging; a licensed transport company will be issued for all transport operations; and environmental insurance (for handling road and maritime insurance).

    3.3 at least 1,000 capacitors collected at the central interim storage site before export

    Planned activities:

    • Based on agreed detail phase-out plans at least 1,000 capacitors collected and stored

    The environmentally sound collection, transport and interim storage of PCB capacitors should be preferably done locally (country should have at least one place secured for manipulation and interim storage of PCB wastes) by licensed service providers.

    3.4   PCB from transformers and full capacitors (expected 4,000) exported for destruction at a dedicated facility through international tender

    Planned activities:

    • 4,000 pieces of equipment exported for destruction (incl. PCB oil in drums, highly contaminated carcasses which could not be handled on site);

    In total 2,500 tones (at least 4,000 pcs) of the PCB contaminated equipment and wastes will be exported for destruction in certified dedicated facility. Shipment will be organized from suitable harbour(s) in case the export will be to the overseas facility. Detailed planning and coordination will be provided in the framework of the Regional strategy for PCB ESM.

    It is expected that total volume for overseas export could be decreased due to dismantling procedures so only contaminated oil in UN standard drums, capacitors and highly contaminated carcasses which could not be treated in the region will be matter of export. Where possible, decontaminated metal parts will be recycled locally.

    • Destruction in certified dedicated facility (-ies) in a region and overseas.

    Destruction will be completed by licensed disposal facilities. But a site visit is needed to check if the disposal process is in compliance with the national regulation and international standards. For example, the monitoring of dioxin, water treatment effluent, sludge, ashes. Selection and contracting for the final disposal will be done in consultation with UNEP through international tender procedure.

    3.5 Monitoring report, from third party monitoring.

    Planned activities:

    • Data availability, information and progress comparison conducted against indicators
    • Experiences summarized and recommendations raised through monitoring visits to selected project hot-spots
    • Problems identified and recommendations made; 2 meetings during the project execution organized
    • MIS established and made functional
    • 1 Mid Term and 1 Terminal Evaluations done.
  • Project component 4: Stakeholder lessons learned and regional capacity developed

    Expected outcome:

    Best practices developed for implementing ESM for ongoing management of in-use transformers in project countries, and for subsequent projects

    Expected output:

    4.1 National and regional reports prepared to summarize activities and quantitative achievements including costing.

    Planned activities:

    • Development of project lessons learned and key experiences report

    Based on review of: national reports; regional reports; legislative framework for PCB ESM; PCB inventory verification strategy; PCB contaminated equipment and waste; and experiences in sustainable management of PCB oils, equipment and wastes.

    • Project website developed and maintained (linked to, or hosted within SAPP Website).
    • Best practices for introduction of ESM identified, documented and disseminated (linked to existing guidance, or update of http://www.sapp.co.zw/docs/SAPP%20PCB%20Guidelines%20draft%20Final.doc%20Jan%202008.pdf)

    4.2 Regional stakeholder results and lessons learned; workshop to revisit national reports and endorse the regional report.

    Planned activities:

    • Regional workshop held including participation of private sector, regional agencies and regional associations and other stakeholders to validate project results

    4.3 Best practices for introduction of ESM identified, documented and disseminated to participants, other stakeholders and Parties of the Stockholm Convention

    Planned activities:

    • Best practices report prepared and disseminated; 36 media activities held in the 12 participating countries
Project Component 1

National regulation and international requirements identified in 12 participating countries including infrastructure and enforcement capacities.

OUTCOME 1A

National Regulations Reviewed

Draft regional guidelines developed and adopted regionally

Draft national regulatory frameworks available for adoption

Guidelines and Regulatory framework validation workshop

Regionally harmonized approach for the environmentally sound management of PCB oils, equipment and wastes.

OUTCOME 1B

PCB ESM coordinator designated in each country, as well as officials in each power company

Training of Inspectors and Customs Staff

Persons responsible for PCBs designated for utilities

Establishment of national PCB databases

Regional PCB action plan developed

National consultants

Project Component 2

Regionally harmonized approach for the environmentally sound management of PCB oils, equipment and wastes.

Outcome 2

Templates developed for PCB inventories

PCB Inventory Training

National utility inventory verification plans developed

Oil samples collected and tested for PCBs

Inventory information recorded in national databases

Detailed inventories of PCB containing oils and equipment held by other sectors in 12 countries

Inventory information from other sectors recorded in national databases

Samples collected and analysed for PCB

Feasibility study for disposal/management options

Regional decision-making meeting and phase-out plan developed

Regional phase-out plan developed and agreed

Regional phase-out plans endorsed at national level by utility companies and other PCB containing equipment owners

Project Component 3

At regional level – 12 countries – PCB and PCB containing equipment collected, transported and disposed off in an environmentally sound manner.

Outcome 3A

Training of utilities personnel and procedures in place to perform collection, draining and transport of PCB

Licensing of companies licensed to collect, drain and transport PCB hazardous waste in the region

Collection and draining of transformers

Collection and storage of capacitors

PCB from transformers and full capacitors exported for destruction at a dedicated facility; storages, Transport, Test burn, Disposal

Regional approach for the phase out and disposal of PCB recognized through independent monitoring.

Outcome 3B

Project activities monitored by a third party

Project Component 4

Successful phase out and disposal of PCB and PCB-containing equipment according to national and international regulations and standards implemented.

Outcome 4

Project website developed, updated and maintained

Regional lessons learned workshop

Media events in each project country

PCB management best practice reports

Project Component 5

Project Management and Monitoring

Outcome 5

Regional project inception meeting

National project Inception meetings

Establish National Coordination Committees

National Coordination Committee meetings

Project Steering Committee Meetings, twice a year

Prepare and submit PIR twice a year

Undertake an external Project Mid term review

Independent Financial Auditor

Undertake an external Project terminal review

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